Free To Choose Network | Corporate Welfare: Where's the Outrage?
Corporate Welfare: Where's the Outrage?

Welcome members of the media! We’ve created this section to help with your stories about corporate welfare. Please do not hesitate to contact Marjory Hawkins, Hawkins PR, if you have questions or need anything further. mhawkins@hawkinspr.com | (512) 940-2828.

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Tim and Katie Tuten, owners of The Hideout, talk about the businesses affected by Chicago’s Lincoln Yards development, built with TIF funds in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Mark Cummingham, vice president of communications and marketing at the Beacon Center of Tennessee, said, “Our money is going to these billionaires in order to give them a competitive advantage. This is socialism for the rich.”

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Professor Otis Sanford, University of Memphis, described the pushback from Memphis businesses, who employ and pay taxes locally, when IKEA received financial incentives, in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Ron Becker, owner of Memphis’s The Great American Home Store, relays how he was told there were no tax abatement programs for retail, yet IKEA received almost $9 million in tax abatements.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Carl Smith explains how he successfully took advantage of trucking deregulation and started his own business in 1983.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Jeff Hawkins, co-owner of Hawkins Family Farm, and Pete Eshelman, owner of Joseph Decuis Restaurants, teamed up to battle state regulators and large agricultural associations in Indiana. Their story is featured in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

John Allison, former CEO of BB&T, explains the government’s role in the crash of 2008 in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Lisa Conyers co-authored the book, Welfare for the Rich, which was inspiration for the documentary Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Free To Choose Executive Editor and Cato Institute Senior Fellow Johan Norberg, hosts the documentary, Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, which explores what happens when government policies support big business interests at the expense of small businesses, individuals, and local communities.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Taxpayers of Baton Rouge are jubilant after a Together Baton Rouge meeting to reduce politicians’ ability to offer tax breaks to large oil and petrochemical companies. How they fought this government policy is featured in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Baton Rouge taxpayers were outraged to learn of 80 years of tax breaks going to some of the largest oil and petrochemical companies in their community.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

With many of the world’s largest oil and petrochemical companies located in her hometown, Helen Frink wondered why the money wasn’t finding its way to the Baton Rouge schools and infrastructure in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Baton Rouge taxpayers were outraged to learn of 80 years of tax breaks going to some of the largest oil and petrochemical companies in their community.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Zach Hawkins, co-owner of Hawkins Family Farm, describes how they worked with the Board of Animal Health and the Department of Health to draft a creative solution to an over-reaching government policy in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Jeff Hawkins, co-owner of Hawkins Family Farm, is a fifth-generation Wabash County farmer who believes regulations were used to stifle competition. His story is featured in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Founded by Pastor Marty Henderson, Peace Gardens and Farms grows healthy food for the community without farm subsidies. His story is featured in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

In Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, Pete Eshelman, owner of Joseph Decius Restaurant, The Farmstead and The Inn at Joseph Decuis, describes his experience fighting government policy: “It went from the worst form of government…to an example how government works.”

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Featured in Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?, volunteers at the Peace Gardens and Farms battle the food desert in their neighborhood by growing healthy food and making it available to local residents, using no farm subsidies.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

Pastor Marty Henderson explains how he founded Peace Gardens and Farms to battle the food desert in his community without farm subsidies in the documentary, Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.

“If we’re going to pay farmers, we should probably choose to pay farmers something that puts Americans on a better diet,” said Greg Gunthorp, owner of Gunthorp Farms, which receives no farm subsidies. He is featured in the documentary Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage?.

Credit: Sky Films Inc.
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